36 Comments

  1. Belinda @zomppa
    June 5, 2012 @ 3:52 pm

    THAT’s how you make it! This is one of my most favorite broths, but don’t think I am talented enough to ever make it!!

    Reply

  2. Hamaree Rasoi
    June 5, 2012 @ 4:23 pm

    Delicious and mouthwatering Japanese cuisine. Wonderfully prepared.

    Deepa

    Reply

  3. Jeno @ Weeknite Meals
    June 5, 2012 @ 6:50 pm

    Oh I would slurp that bowl up so fast!

    Reply

  4. Vicki Bensinger
    June 5, 2012 @ 7:45 pm

    This sounds so good. Thank you for all the great info, tips and tutorial. It definitely beats the package variety. Does it taste as good if I use chicken in place of pork or would you sub with other spices.

    Reply

    • Purabi Naha
      June 6, 2012 @ 8:34 am

      Vicki, pork bone soup is always denser than that of chicken. So this soup is made with a combination of pork and chicken bones. Pork bones give the characteristic white colour to the tonkotsu broth. Thanks for your query and have a nice day!

      Reply

  5. Maureen @ Orgasmic Chef
    June 5, 2012 @ 9:24 pm

    Wow, this dish is gorgeous. Aren’t you clever???

    Reply

  6. Cucina49
    June 6, 2012 @ 2:14 am

    Tonkotsu is one of my favorite Japanese dishes, too–thanks for the tips so I can replicate it at home!

    Reply

  7. myFudo
    June 6, 2012 @ 3:29 am

    I agree. Japanese cuisine is both pretty in the eyes and in the palate. Very appealing. The balance is always achieved in every dish. This is such a delight to prepare.

    Reply

  8. Mélange
    June 6, 2012 @ 3:29 am

    That’s absolutely wonderful dish it seems.Haven’t had.Nutritious bowl I should say…

    Reply

  9. Nish
    June 6, 2012 @ 6:01 am

    Wow what a post! And you make it sound so easy!

    Reply

  10. Kimby
    June 6, 2012 @ 6:54 am

    Purabi, your final photo was “food art” — such a clean presentation, with the distinct flavors waiting to be melded together with each bite. Beautiful! Thanks for the step-by-step info and history, too. Congratulations on another blogging award!

    Reply

    • Purabi Naha
      June 6, 2012 @ 8:36 am

      Kimby, thank you for appreciating the picture. I love Japanese food because the food is so appealing to the eyes and tastes great as well!!

      Reply

  11. Shirley Tay
    June 6, 2012 @ 9:31 am

    Hey Purabi, I’m really impressed by you cooking the stock. Chinese also adopt this method of boiling soup & I’m sure u must’ve mastered them all after living in HK. I love Tonkotsu based Ramen too! Excellent tutorial, dear!

    Oh, congrats on your award! And I’m happy to see Kimby here too; we stalk each other’s blog. Hahaha! Hope to see more of u at my side too!

    Reply

  12. Tina Bk
    June 6, 2012 @ 11:34 am

    Congrats on the award, Purabi! This dish looks very enticing and healthy. Interesting technique, but it looks as though the time is just wait time mostly so it is pretty easy to put together. Thanks for sharing this!

    Reply

  13. Akila
    June 6, 2012 @ 3:18 pm

    wow drooling here…

    Event: Dish Name Starts With M

    Learning-to-cook

    Regards,
    Akila

    Reply

  14. Kitchen Riffs
    June 6, 2012 @ 3:26 pm

    “Japanese food, according to me, is one of the most aesthetic cuisines in the world.”

    I totally agree with this! I do very little Japanese cooking, but I’d vote it the top cuisine of the world — it beats out those French fellas by quite a bit (and I love French food). Anyway, nice recipe. If you make homemade chicken stock and cook it long enough (3 hours should do the trick), it turns into “jelly” too, after you refrigerate it. Love ramen – yours is particularly nice. Thanks.

    Reply

  15. Swathi Iyer
    June 6, 2012 @ 3:29 pm

    Delicious, I have seen people gulping hot ramen even in the railways stations during winter month in Tokyo. You done perfect well.

    Reply

  16. Kit @ i-lostinausten
    June 6, 2012 @ 4:23 pm

    Congrats on the award, Purabi! These looks delicious & I must say that I don’t cook a lot of Japanese cuisine. Would love to try this comforting meal! Thanks for sharing! Have a nice day! 🙂

    Reply

  17. anthony stemke
    June 6, 2012 @ 6:40 pm

    Purabi, your soup making skills are non-pareil. The directions are great and the photos very evocative of the Japanese cookery technique. Talk about aesthetics, I can’t think of a more attention-to-detail and eye appeal than they.
    I remember a Japanese neighbour when I lived in New Jersey (USA). she didn’t speak English very well and was ill with severe stomach pains. We offered to take her to the hospital, she agreed but motioned that she wanted to leave a note behind. She painstakingly formed the characters very neatly (although in great pain) and at the finish folded the note neatly and placed it in an envelope and wrote on the outside. That is the Japanese aesthetic quality that makes their autos and electronics so popular. Your recipe reminds me of that.
    Good on ‘ya Purabi.

    Reply

  18. cookingvarieties
    June 6, 2012 @ 11:43 pm

    hi purabi naha, this is a very detailed and orderly presentation.
    you must be a “ramen” expert. i see your passion for japanese food too. have a nice day

    Reply

  19. Peggy G.
    June 7, 2012 @ 12:20 pm

    This ramen sounds amazing! Thanks for the how-tos on the broth and the pork =)

    Reply

  20. Vineetha
    June 7, 2012 @ 3:25 pm

    Wow a bowl of comfort !i have a close Japanese friend and the way she present the food is beautiful,not just food, anything from a simple card to gifts !! It’s in their blood 🙂

    Reply

  21. Sandra M.
    June 7, 2012 @ 4:31 pm

    We have in my birth country that kind of gelatin where we boil like you did but also season it with salt, pepper and sweet paprika and eat it like that with bit of freshly made bread.
    Your recipe is nothing but perfection. I really love this! Great post and pics, Purabi!

    Reply

  22. yummychunklet
    June 8, 2012 @ 6:29 am

    Congrats on the award! Great looking dish!

    Reply

  23. Angie's Recipes
    June 8, 2012 @ 10:51 am

    This looks flavourful and tasty!

    Reply

  24. Tiffany
    June 8, 2012 @ 4:32 pm

    YUM! No pork for me… but I do love ramen! 😀

    Reply

  25. Yi @ Yi Reservation
    June 12, 2012 @ 2:34 am

    when a friend from HK came to NYC last summer I learned about how popular Japanese ramen it was in HK. It’s funny, NYC sort of had its own ramen craze the past few years and new ramen shops are still mushrooming out at an incredible rate.
    I am a fan of tonkotsu ramen and have made it at home a few times. It is definitely one of those dishes that takes a lot of patience and love. Your chashu looks juicyu and flavorful and it must go ver well with the noodle. Great post!

    Reply

  26. Nami | Just One Cookbook
    June 21, 2012 @ 4:49 am

    Wow Purabi, you did an AWESOME job making tonkotsu ramen!! I’m too lazy to wait for 8 hours. I know homemade is going to be good, but I just like the convenience of eating out at my favorite ramen shop. One day I should try cooking… especially winter when I don’t want to go out. =) Fantastic job!

    Reply

    • Purabi Naha
      June 21, 2012 @ 6:41 am

      Thank you, dear! Oh, I am so excited…it means a lot when a popular Japanese food blogger like Nami says it is “awesome”!! Thank you for your comment, you just made my day!

      Reply

  27. Hester @ Alchemy in the Kitchen
    June 30, 2012 @ 9:28 am

    Congrats on the award, Purabi, and well deserved. This is a beautiful dish and you explain why things should be done a certain way so you don’t feel it’s a waste of time boiling bones for hours. The eggs are gorgeous and your finished dish is beautifully styled. Congrats!

    Reply

  28. Anonymous
    October 29, 2012 @ 11:46 pm

    I have tried to make this Tonkotsu base twice now and I can’t quite get it right, my soup always comes out a yellowy-brown colour and not that creamy white consistency that I crave. What am I doing wrong?? I boil the bones in water for like 20mins first, then discard the water and rinse the bones……
    am I just not cooking it long enough, does it go through the yellowy-brown colour then turn whiter the longer you cook it??? does using too high a heat turn it yellowy-brown?? how low should the heat be…….

    sorry for stupid questions but I really want to figure this recipe out…..

    Reply

    • Purabi Naha
      November 13, 2012 @ 10:58 am

      Hello anonymous, slow boiling is important. I used my rice cooker to boil it for around 8 hours. By the end of 4 hours, you will see that the soup has turned much creamier/whiter. Boiling and rinsing, as you were doing, are correct. You have to regulate the flame and be patient to get the results. Also when tou rinse the boiled meat after 20 min, make sure that you wash away the blood clots and all. Also, throw the brownish scum from time to time, during the boiling. Hope this helps!

      Reply

    • Anonymous
      November 19, 2012 @ 1:52 am

      thanks for responding, I will try it again soon and let you know how I get on…….great website btw

      Reply

  29. Yakiudon with Shrimps and Vegetables
    July 3, 2013 @ 6:08 pm

    […] fresh udon in Mumbai, so I used dried udon. To know how to make the browned egg, please refer to my Tonkotsu Ramen […]

    Reply

  30. Belinda @zomppa
    August 1, 2013 @ 5:57 pm

    You’re taking me over the edge!! Ramen is *FINALLY* all the rage here and I’ve been trying out all the joints. I have yet to dare try and make tonkotsu. I’m not as brave as you!

    Reply

  31. dedy oktavianus
    September 10, 2014 @ 9:15 am

    wow, i just made one and i really adore yours, the shiitake mushrooms looks so cute with it’s cross pattern
    Dedy@Dentist Chef

    Reply

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