43 Comments

  1. Dzoli
    October 19, 2011 @ 6:10 am

    Yimmy yummy.Like how you explained about your holidays;)

    Reply

  2. easyfoodsmith
    October 19, 2011 @ 6:54 am

    Hey Purabi! The Kaccha Gola looks delicious and so delicate!! I am a die-hard fan of Bengali sweets and my daughter is nuts about Kaccha Gola! Thanks for the post 🙂

    Reply

  3. yummychunklet
    October 19, 2011 @ 8:15 am

    Looks like a great festival! And this recipe sounds tasty as well.

    Reply

  4. katrina
    October 19, 2011 @ 11:17 am

    When I was in the plantation used to have this during the Devali celebrations. Very nice indeed!

    Have a happy Devali, even here in Malaysia one can feel it in the air already. It is public holidays for us here!

    Reply

  5. Hamaree Rasoi
    October 19, 2011 @ 2:23 pm

    I was in Kolkata this time during puja and returned last weekend only. The Pujo hawa was still in the air…Though I am late but still would like to wish you Shubho Bijoya ! You have done a splendid job . Kaccha gola looks perfect.

    Deepa
    Hamaree Rasoi

    Reply

  6. Junia
    October 19, 2011 @ 2:37 pm

    thanks for these amazing step by step directions! this looks so hard to make, but you make it look so simple :). i love homemade goods 🙂

    Reply

  7. Lilly
    October 19, 2011 @ 2:55 pm

    I never had these before so it really helps to have the step by step pictures. It’s great that you still preserve a part of your culture even when your abroad.

    Reply

  8. Tina (PinayInTexas)
    October 19, 2011 @ 6:31 pm

    This is all new to me…but it looks like a delightful treat!

    Reply

  9. Belinda @zomppa
    October 19, 2011 @ 6:48 pm

    Beautiful! Happy holidays!! I just joined the Diwali festivities here in London.

    Reply

  10. Charles
    October 19, 2011 @ 8:21 pm

    Wow – they look so wonderful. I’ve heard of the milk-based sweets you have. I really want to try and make some myself sometime. I’m slowly building my courage from reading posts like yours 🙂

    Reply

  11. Vicki Bensinger
    October 19, 2011 @ 8:54 pm

    How fascinating. What a fun celebration. If you are in an area where sweets are in abundance what types would there be?

    These cottage cheese balls sound delicious. I love how you detailed each step. I would like to make these just to see how wonderful they taste. Does your son like them?

    What do you call the brass container with fire coming from it? Does it symbolize anything?

    Very interesting post!

    Reply

  12. Stephanie @ Eat. Drink. Love.
    October 20, 2011 @ 12:40 am

    These look really tasty!

    Reply

  13. Ann
    October 20, 2011 @ 3:09 am

    Purabi – these are beautiful! What a labor of love and you could tell by the pictures that the texture got better and better with the kneading. Enjoy the festivities!

    Reply

  14. Purabi Naha
    October 20, 2011 @ 3:31 am

    Thank you for all your motivating comments.
    Vicki Bensinger: In India, we have atleast 20 kinds of sweets derived from milk. Then there are others, which are made up of gram flour fifs, cashewnuts, etc. But milk definitely dominates in these sweets! Aditya loves them and I bank on these since sometimes both my kids refuse to have milk. The brass container is called “diya” in Hindi and it is a must for any Hindu festival (function is the same as that of a candle) and symbolises auspiciousness. In older times, metals like copper, silver or even Gold (for the riches!) diyas were used to worship Indian Gods, since these metals were auspicious. Now, these have been replaced with brass.

    Ann, I am glad that you liked the recipe. Yes, I wanted to show how kneading amazingly changes the texture of the cottage cheese, so I took these stepwise pictures! As usual, thank you so much for your kind comment!

    Reply

  15. Nami | Just One Cookbook
    October 20, 2011 @ 9:02 am

    Happy Holidays to you and your family! Adtya is cute with the drum. 🙂 It’s interesting to see how simple ingredients turn into these cute and delicious balls! I love all the festivals and how exciting to spend time with friends and family. Enjoy the holiday!

    Reply

  16. Peggy
    October 20, 2011 @ 2:16 pm

    Sounds like a yummy treat and I hope you and your family enjoy your holidays =)

    Reply

  17. Balvinder ( Neetu)
    October 20, 2011 @ 3:31 pm

    Purabi, I just finished making khoya. I belong to an armed forces family so I know how we cook sweets in home and share with friends. Your sweet cottage balls looks wonderful. I will comeback again and see all of your recipes.

    Reply

  18. Sippity Sup
    October 20, 2011 @ 10:37 pm

    As I have never had this sweet before I can only imagine how good it must be, but cardamom and saffron it is not too hard to imagine at all. GREG

    Reply

  19. Erin
    October 21, 2011 @ 2:41 am

    What a great post about the festivities. These little treats look great, good instructions as well!

    Reply

  20. pepperandsherry
    October 21, 2011 @ 3:43 am

    Thank you for sharing about such a lovely tradition! These dessert balls certainly do look totally lush and heavenly – if I were a deity, I’d be very happy with them!

    Reply

  21. Lorraine @ Not Quite Nigella
    October 21, 2011 @ 10:48 am

    What a wonderful sounding festivity Diwali is! And thank you for sharing this lovely recipe with us! 🙂

    Reply

  22. Indian Takeaways
    October 21, 2011 @ 12:51 pm

    Very Interesting. Thanks for sharing the Fun & frolic of Durga Puja via your post & pictures. And the katccha Gola recipe is superb.Happy Diwali !

    Reply

  23. Sandhya Hariharan
    October 21, 2011 @ 12:52 pm

    Purabi .. .These are gorgeous…. and wot a lovely write up……

    Reply

  24. Aki
    October 21, 2011 @ 3:07 pm

    Thanks for pass by at Talking Lens.. that one were still under construction really!!.. Err,one thing I Love about Diwali in Malaysia was,the FOOD!! ^_^.v.. Naan is the BEST!!

    Reply

  25. Jenna
    October 21, 2011 @ 4:57 pm

    What beautiful pictures! Those dessert balls looks great, and I loved reading about your traditions.

    Reply

  26. Elisabeth
    October 21, 2011 @ 5:45 pm

    Purabi-Thank you for sharing all the beautiful photos, and stories of your special Diwali festivities. In my former condo apartment, I was fortunate to share in the Diwali celebration by an Indian couple, that hosted the celebration, and I was so honored to be invited.
    Love all the amazing vegetarian dishes, and your sweet treat that you made look so easy to make, but I would not dare try to make it!

    Your little boy is so cute…the drums almost look bigger than he is!
    xoxo

    Reply

  27. Blackswan
    October 22, 2011 @ 5:14 am

    Hey, thks for dropping by Luxury Haven & leaving me your lovely comments!

    Interesting blog u’ve got here! What a colourful post! Let’s follow each other & share our love for food! I’m stalking u now 🙂

    Reply

  28. Kimby
    October 22, 2011 @ 11:50 am

    Purabi, I couldn’t do without sweets, either! On my father’s side of the family, a “treat tradition” was to sprinkle brown sugar over cottage cheese. Maybe one of my ancestors brought the idea back from India?! 🙂 Thanks for sharing your history and culture!

    Reply

  29. Momof3
    October 22, 2011 @ 4:00 pm

    Happy Diwali!! Kacha Gola looks YUM…we make a different version of milk sweet…like you said the main ingredient is milk! Cute pic of ur little one!!

    Reply

  30. The Culinary Lens
    October 23, 2011 @ 10:31 am

    This looks very good. You have put together a great set of instructions.
    I have a lot of Bengali stores beside me here in The Bronx. I do believe they are mostly Muslim. I know there are many culture on the sub continent is the food fairly interchangeable?

    Reply

  31. Tiffany
    October 23, 2011 @ 11:19 am

    Happy Diwali! My best friend and boyfriend in graduate school are Indian, so I’ve gone to MANY Diwali parties! So fun!!! And the sweets! YUM! 😀

    Reply

  32. Manu
    October 23, 2011 @ 11:46 am

    These look so delicious Purabi! Happy belated Durga Puja and Happy Diwali! I know it’s coming up! 🙂
    Aditya looks soooo cute!!! <3

    Reply

  33. Purabi Naha
    October 23, 2011 @ 1:15 pm

    Thanks, friends, for your interesting comments!
    The Culinary Lens: the food is interchangeable only to a certain extent. Each state in India has its own cuisine and sweets. This one is from the place I belong to (i.e., West Bengal/Kolkata) and these dishes/sweets are thus called Bengali sweets. I am sure during the Diwali time you will get quite a variety of sweets at Bronx. But, homemade is always better and pure!

    Tiffany: oh, today I knew something more about you! So do let me know which Indian sweet is your favourite?

    Manuela, thanks dear! Your comments are always so motivating! Happy Diwali to all of you!!

    Reply

  34. Nava.K
    October 23, 2011 @ 1:32 pm

    I have not made this before and its new to me, but sure looks yummy.

    Reply

  35. Hester @ Alchemy in the Kitchen
    October 29, 2011 @ 8:58 am

    Sounds like a great time to be in Hong Kong. Your photos are great and can’t wait to try your unusual sweet.

    Reply

  36. Veronica's Kitchen
    October 29, 2011 @ 10:45 pm

    Happy Diwali to you, Purabi! It’s great to know that the Indian living in Hong Kong still celebrate the traditional festival. Great festival always come along with plenty of good sweets!

    Reply

  37. Tenina
    October 31, 2011 @ 8:20 am

    Wow, these look amazing! What an idea! Is this traditional I’m guessing?

    Reply

  38. Purabi Naha
    October 31, 2011 @ 8:57 am

    Thanks, my readers, for your feedback! A happ belated Diwali to you all!

    Tenina, yes, this is a traditional Indian sweet. I am sure, you’ll love it!

    Reply

  39. Renu navin paliwal
    June 28, 2012 @ 4:42 am

    i have never had this but i am sure they taste yumm.. can say from the pic.. i love that serving dish.. where did you get taht from??

    Reply

  40. Shondesh (Sandesh): Festive Indian Recipe #3
    September 24, 2013 @ 8:06 pm

    […] throat dry and are moist and enjoyable to me. There is a kind of shondesh called Kacha Golla (click here for the recipe), which is a softer version of shondesh. Other popular kinds include the nalen gurer […]

    Reply

  41. Strawberry Sandesh Tart
    February 12, 2015 @ 6:27 am

    […] the traditional way, we generally cook the chenna a bit to make it a bit drier, unless it is Kacha Golla, which is not cooked at all. Baked Sandesh also exists and is popular among Bongs. My tart sports a […]

    Reply

  42. Aman Chaurasia
    April 15, 2016 @ 10:38 am

    Kachagolla, as the name itself suggests is a Bengali sweet and it tastes delicious.
    P.S. I am the owner of a sweet shop in Kolkata and I am not a Bengali :P.

    Reply

  43. Shondesh (Sandesh): Festive Indian Recipe #3 - Cosmopolitan Currymania
    January 15, 2019 @ 10:19 am

    […] throat dry and are moist and enjoyable to me. There is a kind of shondesh called Kacha Golla (click here for the recipe), which is a softer version of shondesh. Other popular kinds include the nalen gurer […]

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *