36 Comments

  1. sangee vijay
    June 28, 2011 @ 4:55 pm

    wow…perfect biryani..thanx for the tips n useful info…congratz dear..enjoy the moment :)tempting clicks…yum..yum..

    Reply

  2. jill Colonna
    June 28, 2011 @ 5:08 pm

    I thoroughly enjoyed your article, taking us through the history and even your description of the royal biryani traditions has me craving that fragrant rice – something that we won’t be able to really authentically do here without the right ingredients, boohoo. Reading this makes me crave even more that trip to India!

    Reply

  3. Stefania
    June 28, 2011 @ 5:37 pm

    congratulations on your article, the history of this dish is really fascinating. This culinary preparations did you come very well, you have a great skill in cooking. Have a nice day

    Reply

  4. Mugdha
    June 28, 2011 @ 5:50 pm

    it looks soo authentic, tempting and delicious..thanx 4 sharing..:)

    Reply

  5. Ushnish Ghosh
    June 28, 2011 @ 6:24 pm

    Dear Purabi
    Very nice and informative article on Biriyani. I like this Biriani recipe. I am a crazy Biriani and Pulao cook. I am adding this recipe to my collection of Biriani recipes and will try out soon, but with Mutton

    Reply

  6. Jeno at Weeknite Meals
    June 28, 2011 @ 6:44 pm

    Love that you shared the “secret”! I’ve never seen people using dough to seal pots, very interesting!

    Reply

  7. Erin
    June 28, 2011 @ 7:21 pm

    Impressive! This looks delicious! Loved reading all about it!! Thanks!

    Reply

  8. Ann
    June 29, 2011 @ 3:50 am

    First off – congratulations on your article being published. I love not only the history, but the in-depth explanation of such a complicated dish. The pictures are lovely and helpful….buzzed it…it’ was just lovely.

    Reply

  9. yummychunklet
    June 29, 2011 @ 6:21 am

    Amazing looking dish!

    Reply

  10. Shilpi Bose
    June 29, 2011 @ 7:24 am

    It was interesting reading all the history and the Biryani of course yum! yum!

    Reply

  11. Three-Cookies
    June 29, 2011 @ 8:36 am

    Recipes on your site look really exotic and delicious. I may have difficult finding ingredients. I had the pleasure of eating really authentic mughlai dishes in India, it was very special.

    Reply

  12. PFx
    June 29, 2011 @ 8:40 am

    What’s better than Biryani? NOthing!
    A good biryani always brings me to tears. Unfortunately, there are not many here in NZ, as compared to OZ where I used to chef lots in Indian restaurant. I have a fondness of them. It is a long long process and it’s not just a meal for 1. It’s been a while since I have made it.

    So you are cooking all these in Hong Kong? It’s a bit difficult isn’t it?
    Thanks for poppin by my blog.

    Reply

  13. Ushnish Ghosh
    June 29, 2011 @ 8:49 am

    Dear Purabi
    I feel good reading your comment at Niramish Mangsho….This is just one recipe with ginger and cardamom..I am trying to get more niramish magsho recipes before they vanish.
    I have a boti still for cutting Chalta and also shil- NoDa. For cooking some special dish your boudi wet grinds all spices. ( She has strong muscles ha ha )
    Have a nice week
    Ushnishda

    Reply

  14. Tina @flourtrader
    June 29, 2011 @ 9:11 am

    This is really a great post. It is very informative about the history of this tasty dish and the instructions on how to prepare are very clear. You know, we all see a lot of untapped talent in the blogging world and I am so glad that Zomppa discovered you and recognized your talent. Consider this only the beginning!

    Reply

  15. Parsley Sage
    June 29, 2011 @ 12:46 pm

    I had no idea biryani was such a science! I knew I liked eating it..didn’t realize it was a culinary journey in the kitchen 🙂 Thanks for sharing and for all the cool information. Buzzed!

    Reply

  16. Mumsfilibaba
    June 29, 2011 @ 2:02 pm

    It looks great. I love indian food. Unfortunatley it is really hard to get all the ingredients here in Europe for this tasty biryani.

    Reply

  17. Divya Yadava
    June 29, 2011 @ 2:25 pm

    Hi Purabi! This is an impressive post – very comprehensive. I didn’t realize so much went into making biryani. I definitely want to try this out – it’ll be a fun experiment in the kitchen!

    Reply

  18. Susan
    June 29, 2011 @ 3:12 pm

    Hi, Purabi!

    Thanks for visiting my blog. This is a stunning post – I love the history as well. Even though we enjoy Indian dishes, I don’t know much about how they evolved. It’s easy to take for granted how available spices are in modern times and hard to believe they used to be guarded and carried from place to place like treasures.

    Congratulations on being published!

    Reply

  19. purabi naha
    June 29, 2011 @ 3:39 pm

    Thank you, all, for your delicious comments! Each one of you have made me smile with your priceless comments. I would like to tell you that I an happy to know that each one of you enjoyed your stay here. What more can I ask for?

    Yes, getting authentic ingredients is sometimes difficult in Hong Kong. But, where there is a will, there is a way! I found out the numbers of Indian grocers here, who deliver at my home. I try to get a few ingredients like saffron directly from my country whenever I visit there!!

    Reply

  20. Drick
    June 29, 2011 @ 8:22 pm

    very nice explanation of how you make this dish, it really shows you know what you are talking about…. well deserved accolades for a published article… thanks for visiting my blog, hope you try some of our slow cooked bbq

    Reply

  21. kothiyavunu.com
    June 29, 2011 @ 8:22 pm

    Congrats on ur article..great post! U are making me hungry!! Seriously tempting..YUM!

    Reply

  22. The Shiksa in the Kitchen
    June 29, 2011 @ 11:08 pm

    I love how hard you are working to recreate these wonderful flavors in Hong Kong! Such fabulous spices…

    Reply

  23. Tiffany
    June 29, 2011 @ 11:44 pm

    congrats on your guest post!!!

    Reply

  24. Rebecca from Chow and Chatter
    June 30, 2011 @ 3:13 am

    wow you make biriyani like a pro impressive my bro in law makes it well love it great post

    Reply

  25. Carol @ There's Always Thyme to Cook
    June 30, 2011 @ 3:30 am

    Terrific article, I enjoyed your post! Biryani looks delicious, so many delicious flavors!

    Reply

  26. peachkins
    June 30, 2011 @ 3:53 am

    I would like to taste authentic biryani someday!

    Reply

  27. Sailor
    July 1, 2011 @ 12:18 am

    I love Biryani and it was really interesting to know the history and the different techniques to make it. I love to visit different placess which serves Biryani and taste the differencess.
    Cruise Pictures

    Reply

  28. Lipsy
    July 2, 2011 @ 6:23 am

    Me and my hubby are die hard Biryani lovers and our weekends must have is Home Made Biryani…I loved your recipe which is quite similar to the way I make it…but i do add ginger garlic paste for marination and few fried onions too!!!
    thanks for dropping lovely comments always
    Much love
    http://fashionquotient.blogspot.com/ .

    Reply

  29. Shireen Sequeira
    July 7, 2011 @ 9:22 am

    Wonderful article and lovely recipe, thanks so much for sharing it, i am bookmarking it. Also, thanks for your lovely comments on my blog 🙂

    Reply

  30. Foodycat
    July 8, 2011 @ 8:41 am

    Your blog is amazing! Thank you for stopping by mine. I’ve only made biryani once, and it was such a time consuming process I decided I would only do it again for a very special occasion. I love this article explaining the differences between the styles!

    Reply

  31. Balvinder ( Neetu)
    October 26, 2011 @ 7:41 pm

    Hi Purabi
    I checked your blog. Its nice. Biryani is one of my favourite and i could not resist writing a comment. I have never made Biryani from raw meat. Your recipe seems to be worth trying. Happy Diwali! Visit my blog whenever you feel like at http://simpleglutenfreekitchen.blogspot.com/

    Reply

  32. Ina
    March 5, 2013 @ 3:20 pm

    Very nice description about the history and complexities of making biryani well!

    Drop by our New York City-based Indian cooking blog anytime!

    http://www.bigapplecurry.com

    Reply

  33. Vegetarian Biryani with Stuffed Chillies
    October 31, 2013 @ 8:04 pm

    […] The modern household biryani setup is simple and doesn’t commonly use hot charcoal now. In my first biryani post in this blog, I had written in detail about the history, the kinds and the methods to cook biryanis. And yes, if […]

    Reply

  34. Naisola
    April 28, 2016 @ 8:37 am

    Love the tip on the flour dough…always have a problem with steam escaping.

    Reply

  35. marriasharma
    September 21, 2016 @ 10:26 am

    The best Biryani I have ever made.Thanks for sharing such a wonderful recipe with exact details….

    Reply

  36. Jomesh Thomas
    August 15, 2017 @ 2:50 am

    I cooking my dum biriyani in charcol pit

    Reply

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